How to Implement Row and Column-Level Security in Snowflake for Customer Behavior Analytics

Introduction

  • What row- and column-level security are (examples)
  • Why they are needed for instances like this

Step 1: Register Snowflake data sources within Immuta
Step 2: Create tags to detect and classify sensitive data
Step 3: Write a row-level redaction policy
Author a single policy to show rows only where the data user’s region matches that of the data according to the region/location they are authorized to access. Policy logic should reference attributes about users from various external systems.
is a in . should only be able to query region data.
Step 4: Tag columns within data sources to implement global policies
Author a single policy to mask columns containing sensitive data types unless there is an authorized purpose for access.
Mask

using hashing except where the user is acting under an appropriately authorized purpose.
Step 5: Use metadata and attributes to enforce fine-grained access control
Step 6: Query data set with row- or column-level redaction enforced on read
Step 7: Audit

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Introduction:
What row- and column-level security are (examples)
Why they are needed for instances like this

Step 1: Register Snowflake data sources within Immuta
Step 2: Create tags to detect and classify sensitive data
Step 3: Write a row-level redaction policy
Author a single policy to show rows only where the data user’s region matches that of the data according to the region/location they are authorized to access. Policy logic should reference attributes about users from various external systems.
is a in . should only be able to query region data.
Step 4: Tag columns within data sources to implement global policies
Author a single policy to mask columns containing sensitive data types unless there is an authorized purpose for access.
Mask using hashing except where the user is acting under an appropriately authorized purpose.
Step 5: Use metadata and attributes to enforce fine-grained access control
Step 6: Query data set with row- or column-level redaction enforced on read
Step 7: Audit

Introduction

  • What row- and column-level security are (examples)
  • Why they are needed for instances like this

Step 1: Register Snowflake data sources within Immuta
Step 2: Create tags to detect and classify sensitive data
Step 3: Write a row-level redaction policy
Author a single policy to show rows only where the data user’s region matches that of the data according to the region/location they are authorized to access. Policy logic should reference attributes about users from various external systems.
is a in . should only be able to query region data.
Step 4: Tag columns within data sources to implement global policies
Author a single policy to mask columns containing sensitive data types unless there is an authorized purpose for access.
Mask

using hashing except where the user is acting under an appropriately authorized purpose.
Step 5: Use metadata and attributes to enforce fine-grained access control
Step 6: Query data set with row- or column-level redaction enforced on read
Step 7: Audit

  1. Spoke Link 1
  2. Spoke Link 2
  3. Spoke Link 3